The MINI John Cooper Works GP
The MINI John Cooper Works GP

The limited fastest Mini ever has been revealed and is known as the MINI John Cooper Works GP.

The new car packs more power and some serious aero.

The MINI John Cooper Works GP name has been used by the BMW-owned brand in the past and embodies maximum performance and uncompromising dynamics. It follows on from the likewise limited-edition John Cooper Works GP small series of 2013 and 2006.

This model is limited to just 3,000 units.

The MINI John Cooper Works GP distils the racing essence of the modern MINI.

Classic MINI icons such as the elliptical headlights and the hexagonal radiator grille ensure a clear-cut sense of identity and high recognition value.

At the same time, characteristic John Cooper Works elements such as the hood scoop in the bonnet and the hexagonal honeycomb grille with GP logo in the radiator grille underscore the sporty perception of the front.

The use of lightweight materials such as carbon fibre optimises the power-to-weight ratio, while the highly optimised axle load distribution promises the hallmark MINI go-kart feeling. The absolute highlight in the side view are the attached wheel arch covers – so-called spats – which are made of carbon fibre.

Elaborately hand-crafted recycled carbon fleece from the Landshut plant is used here. For the first time, the carbon fibre fabric is directly visible and showcased by means of black hexagon stitching.

Prominently placed at the centre of the lower rear area, the classic double tailpipe embodies the John Cooper Works DNA.

The latest production techniques such as 3D printing round off the special interior experience. A striking highlight from the driver’s perspective are the aluminium shift paddles on the sports steering wheel – manufactured using 3D printing.

Another new element is the 3D-printed steering wheel clasp and the individual decorative trim strip in the passenger area. Each decorative trim strip is unique and bears the vehicle’s limited-edition production number.

Their GP-specific hexagonal structure echoes the surface structure of the shift paddles. In this way, MINI demonstrates a whole new dimension of how 3D printing can be integrated in the serial production process.

The use of additive processes such as 3D printing not only raises customisation to a new level, it also enables entirely new forms of design style that were not previously possible using conventional tools.

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