How is Huawei Planning to Tackle the Computing Market?

Huawei estimates that in the next five years, statistical computing will become the mainstream and AI computing will account for more than 80% of all computing power used around the world.

Ken Hu outlines Huawei’s computing strategy in his keynote at HUAWEI CONNECT 2019
Ken Hu outlines Huawei’s computing strategy in his keynote at HUAWEI CONNECT 2019

At Huawei Connect 2019, Huawei announced its strategy for the computing market.

The conference is an annual flagship event hosted by Huawei for the global ICT industry and is held in Shanghai from September 18 to 20, 2019.

This year’s Conference is themed on “Advance Intelligence” and aims to establish an open, cooperative, and shared platform for customers and partners to explore new opportunities for an intelligent future.

At Huawei Connect 2019, in his keynote address Ken Hu, Huawei’s deputy chairman outlines Huawei’s computing strategy.

“The future of computing is a massive market worth more than two trillion US dollars,” said Hu.

“We’ll keep investing with a strategy that focuses on four key areas. We will push the boundaries of architecture, invest in processors for all scenarios, keep clear business boundaries, and build an open ecosystem.”

Huawei’s computing strategy

The industry’s approach to computing is evolving from rule-based to statistical models, which are the foundation of machine learning.

Huawei estimates that in the next five years, statistical computing will become the mainstream and AI computing will account for more than 80% of all computing power used around the world.

To carve out a place in this market, Huawei’s strategy will focus on four key areas:

  • Architecture innovation. Last year Huawei launched the Da Vinci architecture, an innovative processor architecture designed to provide a steady and abundant supply of affordable computing power. Huawei will continue to invest in basic research.
  • Investment in all-scenario processors. Huawei has a full lineup of processors: Kunpeng processors for general-purpose computing, Ascend processors for AI, Kirin processors for smart devices, and Honghu processors for smart screens.
  • Clear business boundaries. Huawei won’t sell its processors directly. Instead, it will provide them to its customers in the form of cloud services, and to its partners in the form of components, prioritizing support for integrated solutions.
  • Building an open ecosystem. In the next five years, Huawei will invest another US$1.5 billion in its developer program. The aim is to expand the program to support five million developers and enable Huawei’s worldwide partners to develop the next generation of intelligent applications and solutions.

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