Note with password 123456 on a wooden kitchen wall with pins cybersecurity 3D illustration
Note with password 123456 on a wooden kitchen wall with pins cybersecurity 3D illustration (Photo Credit: www.shutterstock.com)

With so many online users falling victims to hacking, it seems more vital than ever before to find simple security for all your online passwords.

But that’s easier said than done.

Many people utilise the same passwords to login to multiple websites, making themselves vulnerable to hackers seeking to steal their data, personal information, etc.

That said, South Africa’s Ansys has developed a new product aimed at solving this challenge faced by many users.

The digital technology solutions provider has created an all-in-one online password vault and security authentication product, known as the SOLID webKey.

The company said in a statement that SOLID webKey can generate and store long, unique passwords for every site you visit, giving owners the best security while only having to remember one master password themselves.

SOLID webKey was developed and designed in South Africa at Ansys’ state-of-the-art design and manufacturing facility in Centurion.

The company said SOLID webKey helps internet users to follow global best practices for protecting online accounts, in a simple-to-use but highly secure manner.

The device is suitable for consumers, small businesses and enterprise use alike.

The company said the device ease-of-use and flexibility for all purposes is underpinned by Ansys’ track record in cybersecurity design has been proven by serving demanding clients in the defence, aerospace, industrial and telecommunications sectors.

Teddy Daka, CEO at Ansys
Teddy Daka, CEO at Ansys (Photo Credit: Ansys)

“Research performed on data which has been leaked onto the internet by criminal hackers continually shows that the general public struggles with basic account security,” explains Teddy Daka, CEO, Ansys Limited.

“Year after year, we see that easy to crack passwords such as ‘123456’ or ‘password’ are still in common use, and individuals rely on just one or two memorable passwords or passphrases to protect all their online accounts.”

The challenge is clear, Daka explains. Security experts recommend the use of long passwords made up of uncommon phrases, and that every account is protected with a unique password.

Yet when millions of passwords lost in data leaks area analysed – including some of the three billion stolen from Yahoo! In 2013 – the same simple credentials are used over and over again. And if account name and password combinations details stolen from one service can be used to access another, the user is in trouble.

One significant challenge is that the best advice isn’t getting through to end-users. Many sites maintain outdated password policies which still require a mix of upper and lowercase, symbols and numbers. But even strong passphrases are impossible to remember without help, if a new one is created for every account. With SOLID webKey, you can generate passwords that comply with any policy using the maximum length accepted by the application, without having to remember it.

“People use easy to remember passwords because they choose convenience over security,” Daka says, “And this shouldn’t come as a surprise. We shouldn’t expect people to remember passwords that are made up of 25 random characters for an account they need to access every day.”

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